Courses

The needs of individuals living with motor neurone disease (MND) are complex, as are those of their families/whānau; however, care of such individuals generally occurs in the community.
This online learning is for clinicians interested in mental and or physical health where therapy can be brief, time-limited and available to all who may need it. Thus it will appeal to primary care doctors, nurses, psychologists, counsellors, health coaches and health care assistants. 
Fever is one of the most common reasons why parents and or caregivers seek medical attention for their infant or child.
Jadelle® is a long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) initially approved for use in the US in 1996.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is characterised by a reduction in airflow that is not reversible and is usually progressive in the long term. In many cases it is preventable and can be effectively managed.
This course on dementia is the result of a national collaboration between primary, secondary and tertiary care providers. It is heavily informed by the Waitemata DHB pilot of GPs and practice nurses assessing, diagnosing and managing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and typical dementia.
There are a variety of medications which are commonly used in a sports medicine setting. These are usually used to manage pain or in an attempt to reduce inflammation. Elite athletes may be subject to drug testing. For these athletes, doctors can be very ‘dangerous’ people as the use of many common medications can lead to a positive drug test. 
Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is the leading cause of preventable, traumatic head injury in those under the age of two years. The term SBS is the most commonly used internationally although remains controversial as it indicates one exact cause of injury.
Acute low back pain is common and can occur without any definite event or injury. Back pain is second only to URTI in terms of days lost from work due to illness or injury. There are a large number of causes of low back pain and a definitive structural diagnosis is possible in less than 10% of patients.  
Stuttering (stammering) is common in young children. For many, stuttering resolves by age five but for others it may be an ongoing condition. It is a form of ‘dysfluency’ or interruption in the flow of speech. The first signs of stuttering may appear between the ages of 18-24 months old when there is a burst of language development. It may manifest as:

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