Courses

Fractures of the radial head are common, they are seen in 20% of all acute elbow injuries and make up one-third of all elbow fractures. These fractures typically occur after a fall when an axial load is applied to the forearm, causing the radial head to hit the capitulum of the humerus (fall onto the outstretched hand).
Kia Ora and Welcome to this online Introduction to the HEEADSSS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs and Alcohol, Suicide and Depression, Sexuality and Safety) Assessment. This material is specifically designed to introduce you to the Youth Health and Development context and the HEEADSSS Assessment Framework. 
Smoking is the leading cause of preventable morbidity, mortality and health inequities in New Zealand.
Insomnia affects up to 40% of the general practice population and is one of the most frequent complaints in primary care. It is defined as a report of sleep initiation or maintenance problems despite adequate circumstance and opportunity to sleep, which impacts on daytime functioning.
Food allergies (FA) and other allergic diseases can result in life-threatening reactions and they significantly impact quality of life. Food allergies can develop at any age but are most common in young children 5 years and under, including young babies. 
Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common treatable sexually transmitted infection in New Zealand.
Eczema (atopic eczema or atopic dermatitis) is an itchy inflammatory skin disease most commonly seen in children. It is characterised by itchy, inflamed, dry, scaling, and crusted skin.  If the condition becomes chronic lichenification (thickening) and hyperpigmentation of the skin are seen.
Burns and scalds are a leading cause of injury to children in New Zealand. Children under the age of five most at risk of burns and scalds with hot liquids being the leading cause of injury in this age group.
Constipation is a common problem, occurring in up to 30% of children.  Functional constipation is the most common cause, but it is important to be mindful of the symptoms and signs which could indicate potentially serious underlying conditions. 
The responses of children/tamariki to a traumatic event vary. Even children/tamariki exposed to the same traumatic event may have different responses. Nearly all children/tamariki express some kind of distress or behavioural change following a traumatic event. This course will review childhood trauma from biological as well as cultural perspectives.

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